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Forum begins to bridge the housing-transportation divide

Advocates for sustainable transportation and affordable housing in San Francisco — who have been pitted against each other in this election — discussed their differences and found some common ground for a post-election agenda during a community forum last night [Thu/9] hosted by the Bay Guardian and San Francisco Transit Riders Union.

DropBox employees drop money for Mission soccer field, kick out neighborhood kids

Mission neighborhood tension has never been higher. The tech fueled boom has predominantly white and Asian newcomers butting heads with Latino neighbors who are long-time residents. 

The newest scuffle is over a small patch of green: Mission Playground's soccer field, located on Valencia between 19th and 20th streets.

THE GUEST opens today! Plus more new movies!

FINALLY, clever, retro-styled thriller The Guest is here. Check out our interview with the filmmakers and star here, and then go see The Guest this weekend. You're welcome. 

After you've TCB in that regard, you might also want to check out sleek new Patricia Highsmith adaptation The Two Faces of January (review here), family drama The Judge (interview with the director here), or journalism thriller Kill the Messenger. How to decide? Read on for reviews of these and even more films, plus trailers. 

Remembering Gary Webb, the fallen messenger resurrected on film

I always enjoy seeing fellow journalists and their work celebrated in a Hollywood blockbuster such as Kill the Messenger, which opens tomorrow. It’s even more exciting when that journalist is someone that one knows and admires, as I did the film’s protagonist, the late Gary Webb, author of the explosive “Dark Alliance” series connecting the CIA to cocaine trafficking in the ‘80s and early ‘90s.

The battle for BART board

The race for BART board of directors in the upcoming November election has been highly contested this year. As we previously reported, incumbent James Fang faces a challenge from investor and former solar company entrepreneur Nicholas Josefowitz, a Harvard graduate in his early 30s.

Imelda May on motherhood, rockabilly influences, and when to say “Screw it”

Taking the sounds of traditional rockabilly, blues, and jazz and giving them an injection of her own infectious energy and style, Irish chanteuse Imelda May can make listeners swoon at a ballad or jump up to the searing rockers that pepper her excellent new album, Tribal (Verve), which was released last month here in the United States.

ACCJC dismissal rebuffed, City College goes to trial for its life in 18 days

The courtroom saga between City College of San Francisco and its accreditors reached a new milestone yesterday, as Superior Court Judge Curtis Karnow rejected the accreditors' motion to dimiss the City Attorney's Office's case against the decision to close the college, yet again. 

Like Charlie Brown's decades-long effort to kick the football from Lucy's hands, the accreditors keep trying to get the case dismissed and they keep failing.

CPUC head Michael Peevey is stepping down

The head of the California Public Utilities Commission, Michael Peevey, has announced that he will step down once his term comes to an end in December.

As the scandal of inappropriate emails between high-ranking CPUC officials and Pacific Gas & Electric Co. executives continues to grow, more and more people have called for Peevey to be fired. 

Strange bedfellows: Moderate Mark Farrell endorses progressive David Campos for Assembly

Political moderate Supervisor Mark Farrell announced his endorsement of Supervisor David Campos for Assembly today. It's a real shocker, here's why. 

Essay: Revisiting the Coen Brothers’ 2013 ‘Inside Llewyn Davis’

Joel and Ethan Coen have been creating films for 30 years, dating back to their still-stunning, low-budget debut, neo-noir Blood Simple (1984); it premiered at the Toronto Film Festival and won the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance in 1985. They followed with the screwball satire Raising Arizona (1987), which contains a pair of timeless (and quotable) performances by Nicolas Cage and Holly Hunter.

And yet the Coens' next three films lost millions: the tough-nosed noir Miller's Crossing (1990), the darker-than-black comedy Barton Fink (1991), and their surprisingly enjoyable ode to Frank Capra, The Hudsucker Proxy (1994). Luckily, their brilliant mid-Western Fargo (1996) followed, winning them an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay and a trophy for Frances McDormand (Joel's partner in crime) for Best Actress. 

There are even more inappropriate PG&E emails

Even more internal Pacific Gas & Electric Co. emails – this time flagged by activists focused on safety concerns at a nuclear power plant – raise new questions about the company's tactics of manipulating the state regulatory process.

“All our families are f-ed up:” Director David Dobkin on his Duvall vs. Downey drama ‘The Judge’

With dysfunctional family tale-meets-courtroom drama The Judge (out Fri/10), director David Dobkin is no longer simply "the guy who directed The Wedding Crashers (2005)" — he's also the guy who got Robert Downey, Jr. and Robert Duvall to go toe-to-toe. Downey plays hotshot Chicago lawyer Hank, who verrrry reluctantly returns to his rural hometown after the death of his mother; he's met with hostile hospitality from his aging, long-estranged father, the town judge (Duvall), who verrrry reluctantly allows his son to represent him when he's accused of murder. 

The Judge's biggest flaw (besides its nearly two-and-a-half-hour running time and some sentimental tendencies) is that it tries to be too many genres at once. But those marvelously acted Downey vs. Duvall tête-à-têtes — and one memorably hilarious jury-selection scene — can't be ignored. Prior to its theatrical release, The Judge screened at the Mill Valley Film Festival, and I got a chance to speak with Dobkin about his latest film.

Holy crap is there a lot of good new music coming out of the Bay this week

Looking for something to get you past the hump of Hump Day? Well put down that "which Disney princess is your dog" quiz right this second, for a straight-up ridiculous amount of good new music was unleashed upon the world this week, with a disproportionate amount of it coming from our very own home turf.

Listen up, burst with pride, and let us know what else you're listening to.

Why and how we endorsed what we did

As I sort through the barrage of positive and negative feedback to the election endorsements that we published today — which included some tough calls that have surprised some of our progressive allies — I’d like to take a moment to explain how we at the Guardian approach our political endorsements and what they represent.

Join the Bay Guardian for a community forum on housing and transportation

Fed up with the current state of housing and transit in our city?

So are we. In collaboration with the San Francisco Transit Riders Union, the Bay Guardian will host a community forum tomorrow [Thu/9] titled “Bridging the Gaps in Funding Transit and Housing,” from 6-8pm at the San Francisco LGBT Community Center.

Events listings: Oct 8-14

WEDNESDAY 8

Mylene Fernández-Pintado City Lights Bookstore, 261 Columbus, SF; www.citylights.com. 7pm, free. The Cuban novelist reads from A Corner of the World.

Guardian Intelligence

HOT AND STICKY HARDLY STRICTLY

If you were among the estimated 750,000 people who poured into Golden Gate Park this past weekend for Hardly Strictly Blugrass, our raucous annual celebration of all things bluegrass(-ish) under a blazing sun, chances are you're doing some serious rehydrating this week. Check our photos and review on the Noise blog at www.sfbg.com while you're at it. GUARDIAN PHOTO OF RYAN ADAMS BY EMILY SELVIN

Return of the messenger

By Melinda Welsh

news@sfbg.com

Endorsements 2014

Welcome to the November 2014 edition of a decades-long Bay Guardian tradition. As usual, we did many hours of endorsement interviews with candidates and ballot measure proponents and opponents, along with additional research to arrive at our picks, some involving difficult decisions. We'll be posting the audio from most of those endorsement interviews at SFBG.com/Politics, so come listen in if you want more information.

What’s the difference between David C. and David C.?

The Bay Guardian news staff has been meeting with a host of politicians and local movers and shakers recently, to help inform our decisionmaking on the Endorsements issue for the upcoming November election, which hits newsstands Oct. 8.

You can thumb through it for our full package of voting recommendations. In the meantime, we’re offering a closer look at the candidates here on our Politics Blog, where we’ll post the full audio recordings from most of the endorsement interviews we conducted in recent weeks.

SF supervisors vote to legalize and regulate Airbnb’s short-term rentals

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors today approved controversial legislation to legalize and regulate short-term housing rentals to tourists, voting 7-4 on the package after supervisors narrowly rejected a series of amendments to rein in an activity that has taken thousands of units off the market for local residents.

Alerts: Oct 8-14, 2014

WEDNESDAY 8

Supervisor/Assembly candidates offer views on city parks

Hall of Flowers, Golden Gate Park, SF. social@sfparkalliance.org. 6-8pm. Join candidates in supervisor Districts 2,4,6,8 and 10, who raised $5,000 for the Parks Alliance by the June 30th deadline, as well as candidates David Chiu and David Campos for Assembly District 17, in a public forum to hear all positions on issues such as parks funding. The San Francisco Parks Alliance and Friends of the Urban Forest are hosting this event.

Film Listings: Oct 8-14, 2014

Film listings are edited by Cheryl Eddy. Reviewers are Kimberly Chun, Dennis Harvey, Lynn Rapoport, and Sara Maria Vizcarrondo. For rep house showtimes, see Rep Clock.

OPENING