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primary cat is 51

primary cat is 51

SF weekly sold

Bill gates bought the sf...

‘MirrorMask’

EVEN IF YOU aren't familiar with any of MirrorMask's touchstones

Does Mills make sense?

Does Mills make sense? Peskin measure gives supervisors an early say over a controversial waterfront development By Steven T. Jones It wasn't supposed to go like this. When Virginia-based mall developer Mills Corp. used political pressure by then-mayor Willie Brown and a partnership with the YMCA to narrowly win Port of San Francisco approval, in 2001, for the exclusive right to build a shopping center and office park at Piers 27-31, the project was supposed to slide right through. The Board of Supervisors was effectively cut out. All that elected body

Little girls lost

FREQUENT VIEWERS OF the Lifetime Movie Network know it, as do the producers of Nancy Grace's eponymous "debate" show: Barring the availability of a convenient serial killer (or killer storm), nothing draws viewers like missing children. Sure, war violence is scary, but kidnappings, which are seemingly more frequent and inevitable than ever, are in many ways far scarier.

Monkey business

 STEPHEN LISBERGER IS a scientific star. His decades-long research into how the brain registers and responds to visual stimuli is considered groundbreaking. His colleagues are effusive in their praise. William Newsome, a Stanford University neuroscientist who investigates similar terrain, told the Bay Guardian that "it could take decades, or even centuries" to assemble a complete, working map of the brain's essential functions. "And Steve is one of the few people in the world who's making progress on this."

Animal instincts

Animal instincts As the struggle between animal rights activists and scientists rages on, what's really happening inside UCSF's animal labs?

Poster child

Biz News Poster child Artist Favianna Rodriguez makes history with her politically conscious graphics company. By Momo Chang IF YOU WENT to college in the Bay Area during the mid-to-late-'90s, chances are you've seen Favianna Rodriguez's work. She's the woman behind many of the ubiquitous peace and protest posters displayed on college campuses and in storefront windows, championing such issues as "No on Prop.

Paige two

I WAS TURNED  on to my new favorite restaurant, Jodie's, by Satchel Paige the Pitcher's dad, Mr. Paige the Pitcher. Indirectly. Mr. Paige the Pitcher ate there with a friend, and then raved about it to Satchel Paige the Pitcher, who told me. "It's a tiny place. Six seats. A counter. The guy working it's supposed to be a character."

 "What kind of food?" I said.

 "He said they have everything."

 "Like what?"

Hidden at home

It took a landscape architecture professor from Columbus, Ohio, an historian from Dallas, Texas, and a filmmaker from Modesto, Calif., to tell the story of the biggest scandal in San Francisco history. barrett-fe.jpg In the past few months, two academic researchers

Film: Critic’s Choice: ‘San Francisco’s Broken Promise’

Thurs/29, Delancey Street Screening Room

Army of glum

 

ANY GIVEN FIVE minutes of Battlefield 2 (Electronic Arts) play can resemble the opening scene of Saving Private Ryan. You're riding in an amphibious tank with your squad across enemy waters. Rumbles from explosions start getting louder and closer. Stray bullets hit the tank's armor and the water outside. Suddenly you're on land, the tank stops, and your squad leader yells, "Move!" over your headset. You jump out into utter chaos, bullets flying everywhere, your teammates falling around you.

Cruisin’ for a bruisin’

EVER SINCE THAT fateful day on the family farm when our stud calf Beauregard threw me from his back and rammed me several times against a large oak, giving me one heck of a concussion, I knew I was destined to become a leather queen. I was only 11 at the time, and the options were few for actual experience, but dammit -- if I couldn't have the sex, then at least I'd have the outfits. "And what are you?" my innocent neighbors would ask when they opened their doors at Halloween. "I'm Freddie Mercury!" I'd reply with a wiggle of my little homemade chaps (Hefty bags and duct tape) for emphasis.

Techsploitation

APPARENTLY IT'S BIG news that the human brain is still evolving. A couple of US researchers announced recently that they'd isolated two genes connected with brain size that appeared to have evolved only over the past two dozen millennia. In other words, our brains changed in the past hundred generations. Why this would be surprising to anyone even glancingly familiar with evolutionary theory is beyond me. As long as we keep engaging in sexual reproduction, we're going to be evolving.

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