Stories about City Hall

How the Twitter tax break continues to damage San Francisco …

... plus big city contracts that never got the proper oversight, smoking weed in public -- and Scott Wiener's plan to further gentrify San Francisco. That's The Agenda for March 11-17

Cops continue homeless sweeps, even in the cold rain

Tents are still being confiscated despite dangerous weather, police official admits at public hearing.

The inhumanity of homeless ‘sweeps’

When did taking people's possessions, destroying their shelter, and leaving them to suffer in the rain become the new normal?

Solidarity with Anchor Steam workers …

... and homeless people who are losing their shelter to the cops in the rain. That's The Agenda for March 4-10.

Breed may not be opposed in November—but her policies will be

In D5, the mayor's appointee faces a serious challenge. Her candidate for district attorney does, too. And if she appoints a political crony as public defender, the allies of Jeff Adachi will almost certainly mount a challenger.

Community celebrates the life of Jeff Adachi

More than 1,000 gather to mourn -- but also to insist that the public defender's legacy will continue.

Police commission defies Sunshine Task Force and refuses new vote on Tasers

Open-government watchdog says that vote to approve stun guns was illegal -- but the mayoral appointees on the commission dismissed that argument and want to move forward with arming cops with a new dangerous weapon.

Will the state Democratic Party support public power?

Plus: Kicking the NRA out of the SFPD, protecting the rights of minors to have a lawyer when they are questioned by the local cops -- and a Right of First Refusal for nonprofits to buy multi-family housing. That's The Agenda for Feb. 11-17.

The lessons of the Monster in the Mission

Developers never come to the table with their best offer -- and in this case, Maximus has pissed of the community and is only putting forward a vague proposal to people who don't trust the company.

SF is ready for public power

After more than 100 years, PG&E is losing -- and clean, renewable energy could be on its way.