Saturday, May 8, 2021
News + Politics Identity theft in San Francisco

Identity theft in San Francisco

Why take our hospital's name away and give it to Facebook and the banks?

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48hillszuckerberggeneral

San Francisco General nurses, to whom it may concern

Please answer several questions; I’d really like to learn

They’ve told you what to call it, though you make its mission real

This theft of its identity is a very rotten deal

Our hospital, a public place, now how can I explain?

The city took its name away and gave it a Facebook name

Mark Zuckerberg gave us money and for that we must give thanks

But why on earth take the name away and give it to him and the banks?

Wells Fargo foreclosed on houses and they profit from displacement

Your patients are discharged from here and have to sleep on pavement

Taxpayers bailed out Wells Fargo while you learn to be lean,

Does putting their name on a hospital seem just a little mean?

The Bank of America’s very name has a patriotic flair

But naming a unit after it could seem a bit unfair

Might some patients get afraid and not in a healing mood

When reminded that they can’t afford to pay for rent or food?

The banks don’t empty urinals, that’s far beneath their station

There is no app for passing meds, that’s not Facebook’s vocation

Back in the day, they used to say: beggars can’t be choosers

If health care is all pay-to-play must some then end up losers?

You’re nurses not economists and these are just the facts

But maybe we can keep our name and they can pay their tax?

You’re almost at the end of lunch, your patients all are sick

Let me ask you one more time, I’ll try to make it quick

Mark Zuckerberg gave us money

And for that we owe him thanks

But why on earth take the name away and give it to him and the banks?

Sasha Cuttler and Mary Magee are nurses.

56 COMMENTS

  1. I concur about the salary. But $32K in benefits, most of which goes into the pension pot, is what is going to bankrupt San Francisco some day. Public-sector workers retire at 58 on average with pensions equivalent to 80% of their pay. They should be covering their own pensions.

    They should be funding more of their own pensions. This is what diverts money that should be going straight into school classrooms and infrastructure, etc.

  2. I’d much rather see a dedicated, hard-working nurse with years of experience and life & death responsibility earning that kind of money, than coders for non-essential social networking and instant gratification apps.

  3. “Taxpayers bailed out Wells Fargo” no they didn’t one of the few banks that did not get money from the Bail out

  4. Everyone should be paid more, but don’t distract from the fact that nurses have been some of the highest paid employees on the City’s payroll. http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/matier-ross/article/With-OT-4-S-F-nurses-made-300-000-in-a-year-2329063.php
    Some folks being significantly paid more means there a bunch of people making less, and this says a lot about which union have the most influence.

    If Twitter did not move to Mid-Market we would of gotten $0 tax revenue from them. Also, the city had 11% unemployment at the time, it’s now 3%. Where do you think the money comes from to pay City employees exactly?

    Based on the homeless count, it seems that only a little less than the 3rd of the 71% (not 75%) of homeless who were living in SF prior to their homelessness were renters. https://sfgov.org/lhcb/sites/sfgov.org.lhcb/files/2015%20San%20Francisco%20Homeless%20Count%20%20Report_0.pdf

    That would seem to say that only a minority of homeless ended up that way because they weren’t able to afford the rent or pay their mortgage. Furthermore 29% came to SF because they were homeless. In other words, you probably should be complaining more about SF having to unfairly foot the bill for the State and country’s homeless problem instead of trying to scapegoat tech. Not included in that 71% number is the fact that while those folks may had some form of housing, it seems a majority of that number were in unstable situations (ie crashing on a couch, or living in a hotel), so they may have been recent arrivals already on the verge of homelessness.

    An even simpler way to track to see if tech and foreclosures are responsible for our homeless problem is simply to just look at SF’s housing population historically. Numbers basically show that San Francisco has basically had homelessness somewhere in the 6000s for about a decade now.

    http://ww4.hdnux.com/photos/30/67/25/6518083/14/1200×1200.jpg
    If tech and foreclosures were the main issue, you’d see a significant rise, but there isn’t. This is exactly why we shouldn’t base policy off of emotions, political biases and anecdotal evidence, they just lead to whacked out conclusions, especially when you have non-experts chiming in and trying to play economist.

  5. Wow. Either you think nurses in the Bay Area should not make that much ( and apparently our salaries are less than some other hospitals in the Bay Area) or you think nurses should not speak up about the direction our workplace is moving. And just to round out your picture, Sasha became an AIDS nurse during a devastating time in the epidemic, continued in homecare, and also as a homecare nurse, volunteered to visit a patient with SARS. As nurses at public health sites, we see the ravages of poverty and homelessness, and we know that some of that is related to the city prioritizing skyrocketing market rate and luxury housing over affordable housing. We know big companies have been given tax breaks. In a recent count of the homeless in SF, it was learned that 75% had previously been housed in SF. Wells Fargo has foreclosed on numerous working class San Franciscans. The Zuckerbergs did a very, very generous thing, and should be lauded, but the taxpayers and dedicated staff have been supporting this public hospital for over a hundred years.

  6. Thank you, Sasha and Mary, for pointing out the downside of corporate “philanthropy”. My undergraduate college was renamed after a WWII war profiteer’s donation and even after twenty years he still acted like he owned the place.

  7. It’s very tacky but so typical of corporate to have MZ’s name tacked on to the front of SF General Hospital. If I had given them millions or billions of dollars, I wouldn’t want or need the attention of having my name permanently attached to the front of the building. That’s a bit much. “Muchas Gracias” in a letter to me would be sufficient. I wouldn’t need or want the attention or publicity of having my name on the building. But with MZ, consider the source. It’s all about celebrity him and his partner and their celebrity baby. These are attention-seeking wealthy corporatists. And why is anyone still using Facebook, the biggest data-mining surveillance state around?. WTF is a “face book?”

    “Facebook is an appalling spying machine.”—– Julian Assange

    Do Not Be Impressed by Mark Zuckerberg’s Phony Generosity
    http://rall.com/2015/12/02/syndicated-column-do-not-be-impressed-by-mark-zuckerbergs-phony-generosity

  8. Except when it’t not pure philanthropy. Tax breaks, publicity, ego gratification, face-saving, etc., make it something other than generosity of the heart.

  9. Priorities screwed up much? How about it if they just didn’t give the money if the name is so horrible? The patients will be much better off knowing that the hospital didn’t have to put the name of an evil techie on the building.

    This thing doesn’t even make sense, they didn’t label it Facebook General Hospital, they named it after the guy who founded it.

  10. This is one of the most shameful posts I have seen ever on the internet. Giving someone (Zuckerberg) shit for giving money to a wonderful resource like SF General is disgusting. Sasha and Mary are disgusting human beings.

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